Our Pearls

Being committed to giving our customers the highest quality at the fairest price, we import our pearls directly from reputable traders and growers in the Far East. Cutting out the middleman allows us to provide the biggest selection of pearls at the most competitive prices. Our jewellery collections are constantly evolving to reflect the desires of our customer base. They include everything from stunning pearl earrings and exquisite pearl bridal jewellery to elegant pearl necklaces and fine men's pearl jewellery.

A pearl is the natural by-product created by the defensive response of a bivalve or gastropod. When attacked, injured by a parasite or another event injures the fragile rim of the external shell The animal in response forms a cyst around the offending particle, we call this the “pearl sac”. The pearl sac is then filled with a substance from its internal mantle we know as mother of pearl, or nacre, as this builds up in layers within the pearl sac it hardens and encases the particle, this is what eventually forms our pearl. At least this is how it’s done by nature.

Natural,Cultured & Simulated Pearls.

 

Natural Pearls

 

The description given in the previous section- What is a pearl, briefly sums up how a Natural pearl- sometimes known as an Orient or Oriental Pearl comes into being.

Natural pearls have been prize for thousands of years as natures ultimate treasure-why?-because they are formed by the serendipity of organic nature-and as such one might compare their creation to the miracle of childbirth –each one unique and beautiful.

Diamonds and all other hard stones however, are formed by the brutal processes of inorganic nature and owe their conception to violent pressure, heat and eventual cooling and crystallisation.

Throughout the ages natural pearls, sometimes called “Orient Pearls”, have been referred to by religious texts and historians. From antiquity until the last century the main oyster beds were found in the Persian Gulf. Countries such as Bahrain and Qatar would sell their pearls to Indian merchants who would drill and thread the pearls in to small hanks known as “Bombay Bunches” for resale to the European trade.

Today, mainly due to pollution, scarcity and protection of the oyster beds, the majority of the natural pearls found for sale are “regenerated” pearls that were originally found by divers very many years ago.

The river Tay in Scotland still was for centuries a source for natural freshwater pearls but is now also strictly protected by the authorities.

It is known that Queen Victoria owned some very fine examples. This gives an indication of the regard in which these gems were held.

Large, round examples of good quality natural pearls are so rare that they rank alongside the most valuable of all gems.

 

Cultured Pearls

These are any type of pearl in which the irritation has been deliberately set up or introduced by man to induce the mollusc to coat the irritant and therefore hopefully produce a pearl.

The technique originally introduced by the Japanese over a century ago for use with their indigenous Akoya ( add link) oyster has been extended for use with different 

types of oysters from other locations and also adapted for producing Freshwater Pearls using Freshwater Mussels (add link to freshwater cultured pearl ) .

Take a look at the Growing A Gem section for more information.

Simulated Pearls

These are any kind of man made look alike that are produced in factories and have no direct connection to natural or Cultured pearls as there is no nacre deposition involved.

Often formed by dipping a bead into a solution -often of fish-scales, then baking to harden the lacquer in the hope of replicating the appearance of a nature.

These are waning in popularity as the quality and affordability of today’s cultured pearls have rendered them almost obsolete.

 

Growing a Gem

Pearls are probably the original gemstone and have entranced man for millennia. It is no surprise then,that Man should want to find a way to create pearls on demand -much as he tried to create gold with alchemy. The name given to the art of cajoling a mollusc to bringing forth a pearl, is “Culturing” and is the result of Mans persistence and observation of nature to persuade a bi-valve to produce the gem.



Growing a Gem: Oyster Net

Some of the earliest references to attempts at pearl culturing date back as far as the 12th Century in China and involved Buddhist Monks inserting carved images of the Buddha into the shell of freshwater mussels. The mussels duly coated the image to produce and would have give them a lustrous finish probably similar to the recreated image here.

Other attempts were made through the ages, a notable one being that of the Swedish biologist Carl Von Linne in the mid eighteenth century and involved the use of Freshwater mussels into which he introduced irritants-believed to be an extension of earlier Chinese attempts. His research, although not carried further at the time in commercial terms, formed part of the jigsaw puzzle of how the process was triggered in nature and was later built upon by others. The modern pearl culture process we still essentially used today was developed theoretically by British biologist and advocate of sustainable fishing; William Saville-Kent between 1892 and 1895 whilst studying the Great Barrier reef on behalf of the Australian Government.

Growing a Gem: Oyster Clamp

 

 

 

 

His involvement has only fairly recently come to light and for many years, it was believed the Japanese – notably Mikimoto , Nisihkowa and Mise were responsible for perfecting technique. The findings of Saville-Kents research were adopted by Mise and Nishikowa who subsequently collaborated and were successful in producing full round cultured pearls. Kokichi Mikomoto- the son of a Noodle seller, had at the same time been working separately with a different technique but had only managed to create half pearls, but through shrewd manipulation of the situation managed to not only adopt the better Mise-Nishikowa method, but also take credit for it.
The basic process, developed through a series of patents and eventual amalgamation of techniques by Mikimoto, originally involved wild oysters being fished from Japanese waters. Today baby oysters-known as Spat, are bred in glass tanks in laboratories, specifically for Pearl Culturing . When the Spat are large enough to survive in the wild they are transferred into baskets suspended by rafts in the culturing waters until reaching maturity. When the oyster reaches that stage, it carefully opened, a bead nucleus ,along with a small piece of tissue-or graft from the edge of another mature oyster is introduced into the soft mantle tissue by a highly skilled technician know as a “Grafter”, The shell is then closed and the oyster returned to the sea. Through experimentation, the nucleus found to give the best result was a Mother of Pearl bead produced from the shell of the Pig Toe mussel native to the Mississippi River.
After nucleation, the oyster is initially kept in shallow waters. Several weeks later they are transferred to moored suspension rafts, which keep the molluscs contained in nets at the depth best for nacre production. The netted oysters are tended and nurtured; checked for parasites and generally kept in good health. The longer the oysters are kept suspended the better quality the resulting pearls, unfortunately this also means an increase in the possibility of oyster loss through natural hazards such as infection, which results in fewer and correspondingly higher priced pearls The actual culturing times can vary from a few months to several years. Harvesting is carried out during the coldest time of the year, when the lustre of the pearl is at its best. The Oyster is removed from the sea, opened and the pearl carefully extracted. It is only then the farmer can see if all his hard work has paid off.
For decades this technique of Culturing Seawater or Akoya Pearls was seen as a national treasure and kept a closely guarded secret by Mikimoto, who emerged as the kingpin of the industry and one of the world’s first branding and marketing wizards. Today however Pearl culturing is carried on in many locations across the globe with different mollusc species producing differing pearl types- (link to pearl types)

 

 

 

 

For decades this technique of Culturing Seawater or Akoya Pearls was seen as a national treasure and kept a closely guarded secret by Mikimoto, who emerged as the kingpin of the industry and one of the world’s first branding and marketing wizards. Today however Pearl culturing is carried on in many locations across the globe with different mollusc species producing differing pearl types- (link to pearl types)

This type of culturing gives rise to a pearl which is similar to a natural pearl in that is almost solid nacre rather than mainly nucleus as in the case of the Akoya-or seawater Cultured Pearl. For decades the Japanese produced good quality freshwater Pearls in Lake Biwa, a very large lake near Kyoto, until its demise due to pollution in the 1980’s. Practically all freshwater pearls of a certain appearance-regardless of their true origin became known as “Biwa Pearls”. Even today this practice still continues. Around the time Lake Biwa went into decline, freshwater pearl production in China went into overdrive. Prior to this time China had been producing relatively low quality and poor shape Pearls often called “Iridescent Rice Crispies”. All this changed in an incredibly short period of time and today China is the biggest producer of Freshwater Pearls in the world.



Zhuji Pearl farm | Pearl Gallery

With clean water, a large cheap rural work force based in central eastern China, and a huge amount of effort put into research and development, China has also brought off an amazing increase in quality, diversity of shape and colour, and most noticeably- size. Important recent developments led to Chinese farmers successfully adapting the bead nucleation technique into freshwater mussels and can now create pearls in a variety of shapes including very round and sizes up to 18mm. Farming in Rivers, Lakes and even irrigation channels, China has truly revolutionised the pearl market in the same way Mikimoto had done decades before. They have turned the wheel one stage further.

 

 

 

Akoya

Oyster:
Pinctada Fucata Martensi

Shapes:
Round and Baroque (irregular), occasionally drop shape.

Sizes:
Approximately 2 mm to 10mm - rarely larger.

Colours:
White, (overtones from pink through yellow and green) Yellow, Black and Grey tones in various shades. Black tones are always dyed or irradiated– unless Cortez pearls, Grey usually dyed but can also be natural colours.

Regions:
Japan, Vietnam,China ( rare now) Venezuela and Sea of Cortez (rarely).

Learn More

The Akoya name comes from the local Japanese for the indigenous oyster variety used in its production: a relatively small oyster measuring 7 to 8 cm on average and scientifically called Pinctada Fucata Martensiie.
The Akoyagai oyster -to give it its true local name, typically produces pearls from around 2 mm to 10 mm due to its small size.

Freshwater pearls one the other had can produce much larger pearls and a number of pearls per shell, while Akoya oysters will rarely produce more than one pearl and seldom two per shell. The main production areas for the industry are centred on the Shima peninsular; notably Ago and Gokasho bays and also the Uwe coast of the Ehime prefecture- where the calm sheltered waters are ideal for culturing. The harvesting of Akoya pearls takes place in the cold winter months between November and February when the skin of the pearl is at its best.

After post production processes, such as sorting and grading are carried out, the pearls are marketed and traded via Kobe. Akoya pearls are most often seen in various tones of white -displaying pink, silver or cream hues, Black and grey colours are also available, with black akoya always being the recipient of either a dye or irradiation treatment to induce the dark colour. Greys on the other hand can be natural or treated in colour. The simplicity and purity of Akoya pearls lend an understated elegance to any outfit or occasion. Coupled with the mirror-like lustre of good akoya pearls, it is no wonder they have been a must -have in every woman’s jewellery collection for decades.

 

Freshwater

Mussel:
Hyriopsis Cumingii, Hyriopsis Schlegeli, Cristaria Plicata and others

Shapes:
Very varied including: Round,Semi Round ,Baroque,Bouton, Coin, Drop, Keshi Lozenge ,Potato, Oval, Rice, Sausage, Twin and many more.

Sizes:
Approximately 1.5 mm to 18 mm

Colours:
Naturally white, pink, peach ,lilac, Treated, black and grey and many others

Regions:
China, Japan (very rare now)

Freshwater Collection
Freshwater Pearl Jewellery Collection

Learn More

The Freshwater Pearl offers the most variants of any of the varieties of cultured pearls. In the past they were considered to be the poor relative of the pearl world, but all this has changed in recent years with a terrific amount of research and development leading to huge quality and variety improvements. Perfect to almost perfect round pearls and now available with introduction of nucleation, whereas in the past rice and potato shapes were the most prevalent.

Two of the main production centres for Freshwater Pearls are Shanxiahu, Zhuji City in the Zhejiang Provence and Weitang , Suzhou city in the Jiangsu Provence. In the past these areas traditionally used the “Triangle” shell as it is known locally, but properly called Hyriopsis Cumingii ,to produce up to 50 pearls in one shell via the tissue only method, which did not need the additional introduction of a Mother of Pearl bead to create a pearl. This resulted in high volumes but inconsistent shapes and qualities of pearls.

In the last 20 years however, crossbreeding of the local Triangle mussel and the “Butterfly” mussel from Japan (Hyriopsis Schlegeli)  has a produced a “Super-Mussel” known by the Chinese as “The Leisure Mussel” which has facilitated a revolution in culturing techniques , allowing the Freshwater Pearl to almost emulate both the Akoya and South Sea in terms of appearance and size. For those that like their jewellery individual and organic in style, the freshwater pearl offers a multitude of shapes and colours –some of which can create totally unique and exactly unrepeatable items.

Naturally occurring in white, pink and peach, the finest freshwater pearls display beautiful metallic overtones – referred to by the producers as “Strange colours”. Freshwater pearls are also commonly seen in every colour imaginable by a treatment with dyes. This tends to be seen more at the fun end of the quality range. Still offering excellent value for money the Freshwater pearl is an excellent way to add variety to your jewellery collection without breaking the bank.

 
Mabé Pearl Jewellery Collection

Mabé 
Cultured Pearls

Oyster:
Pteria Penguine,Pinctada Maxima,Pinctada Mageritifera,Abalone  and others

Shapes:
Round, Pear ,Oval,Heart ,Triangular, and Others

Sizes:
Approximately 10 mm to over 25 mm .

Colours:
White, Black, Silver, Grey Blue-Green and Others

Regions:
Japan, Indonesia, Australia, French Polynesia, New Zealand and others

 

Mother of Pearl

Oyster:
Pteria Penguin,Pinctada Maxima,Pinctada Magaritifera and others.

Shapes:
Can be cut into various shapes

Sizes:
Various according to size of shell.

Colours:
Naturally white, pink, peach ,lilac, Treated, black and grey and many others

Regions:
Australia,Indonesia,French Polyneisa ,China, Japan 

Mother of Pearl
Collection

 

Mother of Pearl Jewellery Collection
 
South Sea Pearl Collection

South Sea

Oyster:
Pinctada Maxima

Shapes:
Round,Semi-round,Oval, Pearshape, Baroque,Bouton and Keshi

Sizes:
Approximately 8 mm to 22mm - rarely larger.

Colours:
White,Cream,Gold,Silver and others

Regions:
Australia, Indonesia, The Philippines and others

 

Tahitian

Oyster:
Pinctada Margaritifera

Shapes:
Round,Semi Round,Pear Shape,Oval,Baroque,Bouton, and Keshi  

Sizes:
Approximately 8mm to 18 mm

Colours:
Black,Silver,Grey,Bronze,Green,Aubergine and others

Regions:
French Polynesia

Tahitian Collection

 

Tahitian Pearl Jewellery Collection

 

Pearl Size

Pearl Size

Cultured Pearls can vary in size considerably depending upon the variety of Mollusc they were created by.

The smallest sizes can be under a millimetre in diameter and are known as Seed pearls, whereas the largest pearls are general no more than 24mm and a creation of the South Sea oyster Pinctada Maxima. The average pearl size seen most commonly in cultured pearl necklaces would be around 5 to 8 mm.

 

Surface Quality

Ideally a pearl will have a completely blemish free surface, without bumps or gaps caused by uneven coating by the mollusc. It is a factor, which is ultimately beyond the control of the farmer.

In reality most pearls are not born perfect –again like us, and some markings are to be expected. These add to their individuality and personality.

The more perfect the skin –and blemish free the surface, the higher the resulting price.

Freshwater Pearl Jewellery Collection
 
Lustre

Lustre

This is the name given to the loveliest attribute of a pearl, the shimmering rainbow dancing across the surface and is the most important single factor when judging quality.

Scientifically speaking it is the quality of light on the surface when light rays are reflected and refracted by a process called interference.

This phenomenon occurs when light meets very thin films or layers of material; in this case the individual layers of nacre, creating an effect similar to a prism by breaking up light waves into their component wavelengths and therefore colours.

The deeper the nacreous coating a pearl has –the better the lustre seen. Good lustre is on seen on pearls that have had a lengthy cultured time.

Short culturing times lead to an unattractive, dull or cloudy surface appearance, due to insufficient layers of nacre.

 

Shape

In market terms when referring to Seawater Cultured Pearls of all types, a perfect round or drop shape is generally considered to be most desirable.

Whilst attempting to achieve this, the farmer will also harvest pearls of many other shapes, these include off round,button, oval, baroque, circled and Keshi.

Each of these shapes has their own particular loveliness and purpose, and as ever with these things, the beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

With specific regard to freshwater pearls, part of their intrinsic appeal is their incredible diversity of shape.

  • Round Pearls
  • Baroque Pearls
  • Round Pearls
  • Round Pearls
  • Round Pearls
  • Round Pearls
  • Round Pearls
  • Round Pearls
  • Round Pearls
  • Round Pearls

Learn More
Baroque Pearls | Pearl Gallery

Baroque

Baroques are the mavericks of the pearl world and are found in all varieties of cultured and indeed natural pearls. They don’t adhere to the conventional round or drop form, but instead they display organic and individual outlines that have some have said can resemble Tadpoles. They are not considered as commercially valuable as the round of perfect drop shapes that Pearl farmer is always trying to produce, but they still have a certain unique individual charm and saleability. There are different names for the degrees of “Baroqueness” a pearl displays.

These attempt to quantify the amount by which the pearl deviates from the conventional shape, with the terms light ,semi and heavy often applied. The reasons behind why a Mollusc produces such a pearl are still not fully understood, but the general belief is that the pearl was restricted in its ability to move around in the soft tissue of the pearl sac and hence layers built up unevenly and more heavy to one side or other. Another theory is that gases inside the mollusc have an effect on the nacre deposition causing the unbalanced shape.

Whatever the reason, generally people seem to either love them or hate them, but ultimately as a lots of things to do with choosing pearls- it’s down to personal taste. Baroque pearls can measure anything from 5 mm for Akoya pearls to over well over 20mm for freshwater and South Sea Pearls.

 

Bouton

These pearls are pretty self descriptive, but could best possibly be aligned with the term “Cabochon” in the non organic gemstone world, the term for a stone cut with a curved top and flat back. As with Baroque pearls; the shape can be found in every kind of pearl and tend to be used as cheaper alternative to full round pearls which are deemed more commercially valuable. Bouton Pearl earrings are especially popular as the lower profile makes them sit comfortably on the ear- especially with larger sizes. Sizes range from 3mm to over 18mm.

Bouton Pearls | Pearl Gallery
Baroque Pearls | Pearl Gallery

Baroque

Baroques are the mavericks of the pearl world and are found in all varieties of cultured and indeed natural pearls. They don’t adhere to the conventional round or drop form, but instead they display organic and individual outlines that have some have said can resemble Tadpoles. They are not considered as commercially valuable as the round of perfect drop shapes that Pearl farmer is always trying to produce, but they still have a certain unique individual charm and saleability. There are different names for the degrees of “Baroqueness” a pearl displays.

These attempt to quantify the amount by which the pearl deviates from the conventional shape, with the terms light ,semi and heavy often applied. The reasons behind why a Mollusc produces such a pearl are still not fully understood, but the general belief is that the pearl was restricted in its ability to move around in the soft tissue of the pearl sac and hence layers built up unevenly and more heavy to one side or other. Another theory is that gases inside the mollusc have an effect on the nacre deposition causing the unbalanced shape.

Whatever the reason, generally people seem to either love them or hate them, but ultimately as a lots of things to do with choosing pearls- it’s down to personal taste. Baroque pearls can measure anything from 5 mm for Akoya pearls to over well over 20mm for freshwater and South Sea Pearls.

 

Drops

Along with the round pearl, drops are considered the most commercially valuable of all pearls. Drops have many profiles that can vary from oval and barrel to the pointed teardrop shape. The most highly desired are the perfect and symmetrical pear shapes that you may have seen represented in the “Girl with the pearl Earring” movie. Perfectly matching individual drop pearls to make earrings is a very demanding and time consuming job as every single pearl born of a mollusc has its own individual and subtle differences to the next. As with most of the other shapes, every variety of pearl can appear in drop forms. Akoya’s however are much less frequently seen as drops. Size range from under 5mm to over 15mm in diameter generally.

Drop Pearls | Pearl Gallery
Keshi Pearls | Pearl Gallery

Keshi

Keshi pearls are a special kind of pearl. They are formed by accident as result of the culturing process and are composed of pure nacre- actually making them closer to a natural pearl in substance- the only difference being the nature of their conception. The term “Keshi” is actually the Japanese name for “Poppy seed” and came into being as the typical shape of a Keshi pearl bears a strong resemblances to that of these seeds. Somewhat related to the baroque pearl in form, the Keshi has a liquid almost nugget like appearance which can sometimes be elongated. Each Keshi pearl is totally unique and can be high lustrous and beautiful. This gives them their own niche standing and value. Tahitian Keshi pearls are particular desired and Keshi’s in general are definitely a connoisseurs pearl. Size range from 2mm to over 15mm

 

Round

Round pearls and near round pearls are the most well known of all the shapes. Although initially illusive and difficult to create in the early days of pearl culturing, the spherical shape is the classic form for countless necklaces and items of jewellery. The roundness come s from the underlying bead nucleus used in the culturing process, which in itself is dependent on the quality of the mother of pearl shell used. Cheaper production methods when the bead is made from a cube of shell can leave tiny flat areas on the beads which then become flat areas on the resulting pearl. A farmer will not succeed in producing a completely round pearl from every implanted Mollusc he farms ,as the variety of other shapes shown here attest, therefore perfect round shapes are considered highly desirable. Size range from 2mm to over 20mm depending on mollusc variety

Round Pearls | Pearl Gallery
Ringed Pearls | Pearl Gallery

Ringed

Pearls that are classified under this name strangely almost give the appearance of being turned on a lathe. They are related to the baroque pearl and tend to be more often seen in the larger variety of Freshwater, Tahitian and South sea pearls where the effect is more pronounced. The cause of the ringing seems to be closely related to those which form the baroque but possibly for the opposite reason, in as much as too much rotation has taken place during growth. Other theories point to the physical positioning of the nucleus in certain areas of the mollusc tends to promote circled growth. The circling or ringing gives the pearl a character, but is not considered good from a commercial point of view and the value is therefore reduced when compared to the symmetrical forms. The principle applies as that with the baroque pearl, in that beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Sizes from under 10 mm to over 20 mm.

 

Seed

Seed pearls are once again fairly self explanatory. They are tiny spherical or hemispherical ( cut in half mainly) pearls of pure nacre available in sizes from 1 mm up to around 4 mm. These pearls-originally natural salt water pearls, were mainly used in period jewellery from the late 18th century until the early 20th century. Every kind of jewellery was encrusted with these tiny pearls in individual settings each made by hand. Necklaces so tiny and fine that they were threaded onto human hair still exist, dating back to the Georgian period. Today the remaining trade in seed pearls is with Chinese Freshwater seed pearls sold most often via India- which has long associations with natural pearl trading.

Seed Pearls | Pearl Gallery

 
South Sea Pearl Collection

Colour

With Pearls, colour is a complex issue. 

White pearl are never actually simply white, there are numerous overtones and subtle shades from pink through to gold- some more attractive than others.

The range of none white colours is vast when looked at as a whole. Almost the complete spectrum is represented.

This can further be divided into naturally occurring colours; such as those of Tahitian and South Pearls and the Pink to Peach hues of Freshwater pearls, and those brought about by alterations such  as the silver nitrate treatments to Akoya pearls to change them to black or grey.

It’s possible to dye pearls almost any colour –but general only occurs with low value Pearls purely for fun.

A pearl of natural colour will always be more valuable and therefore expensive, than one of induced colouration. The alteration of colour is perfectly acceptable as long as it is fully disclosed.

The deciding factors when considering colour are purely personal and rest entirely on your own taste and on what suits your individual skin tone and budget best.

Learn More

The Akoya name comes from the local Japanese for the indigenous oyster variety used in its production: a relatively small oyster measuring 7 to 8 cm on average and scientifically called Pinctada Fucata Martensiie.
The Akoyagai oyster -to give it its true local name, typically produces pearls from around 2 mm to 10 mm due to its small size.

Freshwater pearls one the other had can produce much larger pearls and a number of pearls per shell, while Akoya oysters will rarely produce more than one pearl and seldom two per shell. The main production areas for the industry are centred on the Shima peninsular; notably Ago and Gokasho bays and also the Uwe coast of the Ehime prefecture- where the calm sheltered waters are ideal for culturing. The harvesting of Akoya pearls takes place in the cold winter months between November and February when the skin of the pearl is at its best.

After post production processes, such as sorting and grading are carried out, the pearls are marketed and traded via Kobe. Akoya pearls are most often seen in various tones of white -displaying pink, silver or cream hues, Black and grey colours are also available, with black akoya always being the recipient of either a dye or irradiation treatment to induce the dark colour. Greys on the other hand can be natural or treated in colour. The simplicity and purity of Akoya pearls lend an understated elegance to any outfit or occasion. Coupled with the mirror-like lustre of good akoya pearls, it is no wonder they have been a must -have in every woman’s jewellery collection for decades.

 

Matching

Matching is an important but sometimes over looked criterion in pearl grading.

Creating a well matched necklace is a very skilled discipline that requires focus, an eye for detail, good colour perception and time.

Before a necklace can even start to be created however , grading and sorting of loose lots of pearls must take place in order to sift out unsuitable grades and sizes  to create a  pool of suitable candidates to drawn upon.Only when this process has taken place can the selection and fine filtering work of necklace creation begin.

Freshwater Pearl Jewellery Collection

Pearl Care

Pearls are natural gems, even cultured Pearls are an organic product created by a living creature. As with all living things, they need to be given a certain amount of care and treated with some measure of respect for maintaining their beauty and lustre.

Pearls are composed of a form of Calcium Carbonate, the same organic substance that builds our bones and teeth. Like your teeth, they won’t stand up well to repeated physical stress or to being constantly exposed to strong chemicals. Your Pearl jewellery will give you a lifetime of wear if you simply look after it with care and pay attention to a few details. The general, often-quoted rule of thumb for wearing your Pearls is “last on, first off”.



Pearl Care : Purfume | Pearl Gallery

You should put on your Pearl pieces after you have finished using any hairspray, deodorant, perfume and other alcohol or chemically based beauty products. The chemicals in these can literally eat away at the surface of the Pearl, robbing it of its natural shine and lustre.

You should remove your Pearls before you take a bath or shower, or start to use any cleansers for exactly the same reasons. It would be nigh on impossible to completely protect your Pearls from any makeup, perfume and even the oils from your own skin and hair, rubbing against them. Pearls are bought to be worn after all! You can clean your Pearls using a very weak solution of detergent on a soft cloth, wiping them over to remove any build-up which may cause them to damage in the long run if left. If they are part of a piece made of precious metal or other gemstones which may need repair or re-setting after some years or accidental damage, any good jeweller should know that the Pearls should be removed before any chemical cleaners or sonic cleaning equipment is applied.

Pearl Care Kit | Pearl Gallery

Pearl Care Kit

£xx.xx

 

It’s also recommended that you get your Pearls re-threaded every one to two years depending on how often they are worn. This reduces greatly the risk of them breaking as their silk stretches and will improve their appearance instantly. We have a dedicated department of expert pearl and bead threaders in-house that would be delighted to look after your precious items.
You can wear your Pearls for special occasions or for every day, one of their best features is their versatility of style. It’s not recommended, however, to wear your Pearls while doing the gardening, for instance, or your Pearl bracelet to do the washing up in, and it would be a definite no-no to wear your jewellery in the pool! Chemicals that make it safe for you to swim can diminish the lustre of your Pearls.
Another consideration during the summer or while on holiday in sunny climes is that it’s best not to leave your Pearls in direct sunlight or expose them to extreme temperatures. Once again, they’re organic just like we are, and won’t survive these without change to their skins, only it won’t provide them with a nice tan, just a faded, deadened surface.
Given the right amount of care and attention, your Pearls will last and stay beautiful. They will age subtly over time, as do people, the colour tending to mellow to a more buttery tone, but looked after properly they should remain stunning essentials in your collection and heirlooms for your family.

Pearl Clean

£XX.XX;

 

Pearl Clean | Pearl Gallery